Kristen Stieffel

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Profile

Kristen is a writer and writing coach, helping writers polish and nonwriters write. She belongs to the Editorial Freelancers Association, Christian Editor Network, and American Christian Fiction Writers. She was recently nominated as 2014 president of the ACFW Central Florida Chapter. Her editing credits include The Ghosts of Emily Gray by C. Keith Carpenter, Veiled Destiny by Shirin Humzani, and Winter by Keven Newsome.

Kristen’s four-book fantasy series The Prophet’s Chronicle is under contract at OakTara. A release date for book one, Alara’s Call, is forthcoming.

Contact Info

Portfolio

  • Kristen’s contemporary novel, Hope and Pride, won first place in the Inspirational Romance Unpublished category at the 2013 Royal Palm Literary Awards presented by the Florida Writers Association.
  • In December 2009, The Cynic Online Magazine (www.cynicmag.com) published Kristen’s story “The Feast of Stevens,” a science fiction Christmas comedy that subsequently won an honorable mention in the 2010 Royal Palm Literary Awards in the “short story, published” category. No longer available at the Cynic website, “The Feast of Stevens” is now available at Smashwords.
  • Kristen’s science fiction short story “The Last Buffalo” was published in the 2009 Coffee House Fiction Anthology (http://www.coffeehousefiction.com).It subsequently won second place in the Florida Writers’ Association’s 2009 Royal Palm Literary Awards in the “short story, published” category.
  • Her fantasy novel The Prophet’s Chronicle: Alara’s Call was a 2009 Marcher Lord Select Main Contest entry.
  • In her 10 years working in the Orlando Business Journal newsroom, Kristen wrote at least two and up to six columns per week. Kristen estimates she wrote more than a thousand items for OBJ, including news-brief compilations, web articles, and opinion columns.

Online Pitch

The Prophet’s Chronicle: Alara’s Call

Alara, a young clergywoman, longs to lead a congregation, but has become discouraged while doing missionary work under a harshly critical superior. Her ministry is interrupted when her father, the prime minister, forces her into a “diplomatic mission” to Makut, a country where her rights and safety will be in danger. An elder statesman intervenes and takes her to Dorrel, the suitor she had to leave behind when she was sent abroad. But Makutian soldiers track them down and capture her. When Dorrel infiltrates the Makutian capital and rescues Alara, he is accused of espionage, and the Makutians threaten war. As world leaders gather to negotiate peace, Alara is called to prophesy to them about their futures, about democracy and about God’s will for the rule of His people. Meanwhile, the Makutian king has ordered that she and Dorrel be assassinated.

The Prophet’s Chronicle: Alara’s Call is a spiritual fantasy set in an alternate world where an egalitarian, monotheistic culture clashes with a neighboring one that is monarchical and polytheistic. It examines how pursuing our unique calling and obeying God’s will can require sacrifice, struggle, and even insubordination.

Although most fantasy novels are set in worlds resembling the Middle Ages, the setting of The Prophet’s Chronicle is modeled after 19th-century Europe. More Jane Austen than J.R.R.

This book will appeal to readers who enjoy stories like Karen Hancock’s Legends of the Guardian-King or Jill Williamson’s Blood of Kings. It will especially resonate with women who long to discover and fulfill a great purpose in their lives, despite the hardships and heartache that often result from pursuing a great call.

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